19 January 2011

Stranded

Do you know that? You read or hear a certain word and immediately a picture, a thought or an experience pops up in your mind. If you tell others about it, they might stare at you, wondering what goes on. Or, there is someone just like you, maybe even having similar ideas. Somehow, I have the feeling the general ability (willingness?) to create such an association of ideas decreases due to media overkill, to name just one reason. But I wander from the subject.

Each time I read "strand" or related words, I am reminded of the song Stranded by Manfred Mann's Earth Band. And exactly this happened, as well, when I saw the following diagram. It's another chess puzzle where you just need to know how the pieces move.

T. R. Dawson
Strand Magazine, October 1911
[b7/6b1/7q/2n5/7r/2Q2N2/7R/4B2B]
Each White piece captures an unmoved identical adversary,
with no route intersecting any other.

Solution
Starting with the paths of the bishops, it is not that difficult as it might look at first glance. After that, there is not much left for the other pieces:
    Bh1-g2-f1-d3-c2-b3-c4-b5-c6-d5-e6-f5-h7-g8-f7-e8-d7-c8-b7xa8.
    Be1-d2-c1-a3-b4-a5-c7-d6-e7-f6xg7.
    Rh2xh4.
    Qc3-d4-f2-g3-g4-h5xh6.
    Nf3-g5-e4xc5.

2 comments:

HeinzK said...

"you just need to know how the pieces move"
Qc4-d5-g3
?!
I don't understand much of the stipulation. The proposed routes don't clear up things...
xoxo

bernoulli said...

Obviously, there were typos. I corrected that. Thanks for telling.

As to the stipulation ... adversary should be clear. Example of non-intersecting paths: given a1-c3, a2-b1 crosses and a2-c4-d3-b1 does not.