29 July 2011

Publishing Chess Problems on the Internet

There are many more endgame studies I'd like to present — and sooner or later I will. But this week, there is another topic I want to discuss. When you see all those diagrams, in my blog or elsewhere, you might think it would be nice to be able to go through the solution of the chess problems interactively. Believe me, I'd really love to present all these puzzles that way. But it's not as easy as it seems.

Actually, long before I wrote my first blog entry, I had spent a lot of time on pondering how the appearance should be. First of all, all diagrams should have a consistent look. That was a major constraint as I do not only want to insert orthodox chess problems. In fairy chess you may have boards of different sizes/shapes and new symbols or pieces. How to do that? So far, I only know two different ways to accomplish this task.

The first and very flexible way is to use image files for all the squares/pieces/symbols/frames. Then you do a little bit HTML coding to create a diagram. There are no restrictions for you. Well, just one ... you have to have access to the files you use. Either you can use those that others already created and share with the community or you do all by yourself and finally upload all of it somewhere on the Internet and create links to them.

I am not so excited about this approach. In case of a webspace where you host a homepage it might be okay. But, writing on blogger.com, I do not want to bother with that. Interestingly, they allow you to use a certain amount of space for images which would be even more than sufficient. Just, I don't want to put too much effort into it. By the way, I do have assembled a set of such files on my computer's hard disk by now. There are way over 300 files consuming less than half of a megabyte — and I just realize I still have forgotten some symbols, argh!

The second possibility is to create a static image for each diagram. That's what I do making use of the PHP Chess Diagrammer — a PHP script which cannot only handle the FEN but also its extension called Fairy FEN (FFEN). It serves almost all needs for publishing chess problems. Moreover, it is very easy to use and no additional stuff is required.

However, if you prefer a more sophisticated solution, I recommend typesetting your diagrams with using a special style called diagram.sty designed exactly for this purpose. But that's nothing to do properly within a few minutes nor hours. There is also a lot of software, both freeware and shareware, to create images of chess diagrams. But there are often restrictions, e.g. only 8x8 boards or only a few fairy pieces at most.

So far, I have not seen any solution that is capable of producing an interactive diagram for fairy problems. On the other hand, if you only concentrate on the "normal" chess board and pieces, I can mention quite a few good things.

There are several online game viewers you can use for free. You simply insert a pgn file or even just a pgn string and get a nice interface to replay a game. Some of them only can process complete games whereas others allow an arbitrary start position. I like the things offered on the pgn4web pages. The only flaw with respect to chess problems is that it can't step into variations, though showing all the moves in the game notation.

Another good choice is the PGN viewer by Chess Tempo. You can see it in action at Yochanan Afek's Weekly Endgame Study. It's almost perfect — unfortunately, there is also trouble with variations. You have no influence on how to format the moves, except for coloring and highlighting. At least I was not successful at figuring out how to split up variations to increase readability. There is just one long stream of moves with all the left and right parentheses as the only indicators. That's quite irritating in case of many and long variations, the more when they're nested deeply.

Finally, I want to mention the Palview package. This is definitely great stuff, I am sure you agree when browsing the examples. Just ... it is quite old software based on command line actions and not so easy to use. Also, you need webspace for all the files. But the results are fantastic.

So, you see the trouble with showing (fairy) chess problems on the Internet. Maybe, some day, someone will write a piece of software for a fairy chess problem viewer. I have a dream ...

22 July 2011

Brilliant Endgame Studies Galore (III)

Round three! I hope you're not tired, yet.

A. Kazantsev
Shakhmaty v SSSR, 1950
2nd Prize
[k7/8/4p3/7P/8/3P4/1Bb4P/K7]
  Win(5+3)  
      1. Bh8!!
1. Ba3? Bxd3 2. Kb2 Be4 3. Kc3 e5! 4. Kc4 Kb7 5. Kc5 Kc7
1. - Kb7
1. - e5 2. Kb2 Bxd3 3. Kc3 Be4 4. Bxe5 Kb7 5. Kd4
2. Kb2 Bxd3 3. Kc3 Bf5 4. Kd4 Kc6 5. Ke5 Kd7 6. Kf6 Ke8 7. Kg7! e5 8. h6! e4 9. h7 e3 10. Kh6 e2 11. Bc3 and wins

G. Zachodjakin
Shakhmaty v SSSR, 1951
1st Prize
[8/4Bk2/8/pK5R/8/8/p3n1P1/8]
  Draw(4+4)  
      1. Rh7+!
1. Rh1? Nc3+ 2. Kxa5 Nb1
1. Re5? Nc3+
1. - Ke6!
1. - Kg6 2. Rh6+ Kxh6 3. Bf6
2. Rh1 Nc3+ 3. Ka6!
3. Kxa5? Nb1 4. Re1+ Kf7 5. Bd6 a1=Q+
3. Kb6? Nb1 4. Re1+ Kf7 5. Bd6 a1=Q 6. Re7+ Kg6 7. Re6+ Kf5 8. Re5+ Kf6 9. Rxa5 Qb2+
3. - Nb1 4. Re1+! Kf7!
4. - Kf5? 5. Rf1+ Ke6 6. Bf6
5. Bd6!!
5. Rf1+? Kxe7
5. - a1=Q 6. Re7+ Kg6
6. - Kf6 7. Be5+
6. - Kf8 7. Re6+ Kf7 8. Re7+ Kg6 9. Re6+
6. - Kg8 7. Re8+
7. Re6+ Kf5
7. - Kh5 8. Re5+ Kg4 9. Re4+ Kf5 10. Re5+
8. Re5+ Kf6
8. - Kf4 9. Rxa5+
9. Rxa5 Qd4 10. Be5+ draw.

J. Fritz
Sachové Umenie, 1951
[8/3n3B/8/N7/4K3/8/8/1k6]
  Win(3+2)  
      1. Bf5 Nb6
1. - Nf6+ 2. Ke5+
1. - Nc5+ 2. Kd4+
1. - Nf8 2. Ke5+
1. - Nb8 2. Bc8 Kb2 3. Kd4 Ka3 4. Kc5 Ka4 5. Nc4
2. Kd4+ Kc1
2. - Kb2 3. Kc5 Na4+ 4. Kb4 Nc3 5. Nc4+
2. - Ka1 3. Kc5 Na4+ 4. Kb4 Nb2 5. Nb3+ Ka2 6. Bc2
2. - Ka2 3. Kc5 Na4+ 4. Kb4 Nb2 5. Bc2 Ka1 6. Nb3+ Ka2 7. Nc1+ Ka1 8. Ne2 Ka2 9. Nc3+
Ka1 10. Be4
3. Kc5 Na4+
3. - Na8 4. Kc6
4. Kb4 Nb2
4. - Nb6 5. Be6 Na8 6. Kc5 Nc7 7. Bf7 Na6+ 8. Kb5 Nc7+ 9. Kb6 Na8+ 10. Kb7
5. Ka3 Nd1 6. Nb3#

V. Korolkov
Lelo, 1951
1st Prize
[2b4k/8/5Pr1/5N2/8/8/8/K1B5]
  Win(4+3)  
      1. f7
1. Bb2? Rxf6
1. - Ra6+
1. - Rf6 2. Bb2
1. - Rg8 2. fxg8=Q+ Kxg8 3. Ne7+
2. Ba3!
2. Kb1? Bxf5+
2. Kb2? Rf6
2. - Rxa3+ 3. Kb2 Ra2+ 4. Kc1!
4. Kxa2? Be6+
4. Kc3? Rc2+ 5. Kb4 Rc4+ 6. Kb5 Ba6+! 7. Kxa6 Rc8
4. - Ra1+
4. - Rc2+ 5. Kd1!
5. Kd2
5. Kb2? Rb1+ 6. Kc3 Rb3+ 7. Kd4 Rd3+ 8. Kxd3 Bxf5+
5. - Ra2+ 6. Ke3 Ra3+ 7. Kf4 Ra4+ 8. Kg5 Rg4+ 9. Kh6!
9. Kxg4? Bxf5+ 10. Kxf5 Kg7 11. Ke6 Kf8 12. Kf6 stalemate
9. Kh5? Rg8 10. Ne7 Rf8 11. Ng6+ Kg7
9. - Rg8
9. - Rg6+ 10. Kxg6 Bxf5+ 11. Kf,h6
10. Ne7 Be6
10. - Rf8 11. Ng6#
11. fxg8=R,Q+!
11. Ng6+? Rxg6+ 12. Kxg6 Bxf7+
11. - Bxg8 12. Ng6#

A. Kazantsev
Shakhmaty v SSSR, 1953
1st Prize
[K5b1/P2p4/7P/1R1P3B/k7/6q1/1P6/8]
  Win(7+4)  
      1. Rb7!
The threat is 2. Bd1+ Ka5 3. b4+ Ka6 4. Be2#
1. - Qe5 2. Bd1+!
2. h7? Bxd5 3. Bd1+ Ka5 4. b4+ Ka6 5. Be2+ Qxe2 6. h8=Q Bxb7+ 7. Kb8 Qb5
2. Bg6? Ka5!
2. - Ka5 3. b4+ Ka6 4. Be2+! Qxe2 5. Kb8 Qe5+ 6. Kc8! Qe8+ 7. Kc7 Bxd5
7. - Qe5+ 8. d6 Qxd6+ (8. - Qc3+ 9. Kb8) 9. Kxd6 Kxb7 10. a8=Q+ Kxa8 11. Kc7 and the b-pawn queens.
7. - d6 8. a8=Q+ Qxa8 9. Rb6+ Ka7 10. b5 Qd8+ 11. Kxd8 Kxb6 12. Kd7 Kxb5 13. Kxd6 Kc4 14. Ke5 Kc5 15. d6 Kc6 16. Kf6! Bh7 17. Ke7
8. a8=Q+! Qxa8 9. Rb6+ Ka7 10. b5! Bb7
10. - Qc,d8+ 11. KxQ Kxb6 12. h7
10. - Qb7+ 11. Rxb7+ Bxb7 12. h7
11. Ra6+! Bxa6 12. b6#

V. Chekhover
Vecherni Leningrad, 1954
2nd Prize
[5K1k/8/8/8/8/7B/5pPP/5b2]
  Draw(4+3)  
      1. Ke7! Kg7 2. Kd6!
2. Kd8? Kf6 3. Kc7 Kg5 4. Kd6 Kh4 5. Bd7 (5. Ke5 B~ 6. g3+ Kxh3) Bxg2 6. Bb5 Kh3 7. Ke5 Kxh2 8. Kf4 Kg1 9. Kg3 Bf1 10. Bd7 Bc4 11. Bh3 Bd5 12. Kf4 Bg2
2. - Kf6 3. Kc5!
3. Kc7? Kg5
3. - Ke5
3. - Kg5 4. Kd4 Kh4 5. Ke3
4. Kb6!
4. Kb4? Kd4 5. Ka3,5 Kc3,5 6. Ka2,4 Bc4+,b5+
4. - Kd6
4. - Kd4 5. Ka7,c7 Ke3 6. Kb6 Kd2 7. Kc5 Ke1 8. Kd4 Be2 9. g3 Bf1 10. Bd7 Bg2 11. Bb5 Bf3 12. Ke3
5. Ka7!
5. Ka5? Kc5
5. - Kc7 6. Ka8! Kb6 7. Kb8 Kc5 8. Kc7 Kd4 9. Kd6 Ke3 10. Ke5 Kd2
11. Kd4 Ke1 12. Ke3
and draws.

A. Wotawa
Deutsche Schachzeitung, 1954
[8/6P1/1k6/8/1B6/1P6/3R2K1/1r5r]
  Win(5+3)  
      1. Kg3!
1. Rd7? Rhg1+
1. Kf3? Rh3+ 2. Kg4 Rh7!
1. Ba5+? Kxa5 2. Ra2+ Kb6! 3. Kg3 (3. Kf3 Rh3+) Rxb3+ 4. Kg2 (4. Kf2 Rh2+) Rbh3! 5. g8=Q (5. Rb2+ Ka7! 6. g8=Q R3h2+ 7. Kf3 Rxb2 8. Qg7+ Rb7) R1h2+
1.- Rxb3+ 2. Kg2 Rbb1
2. - Rhh3 3. Bd6
3. Ba5+! Ka6 4. Bb6! Kxb6 5. Rb2+ Rxb2+ 6. Kxh1 Rb1+ 7. Kg2 Rb2+ 8. Kf3 Rb3+ 9. Kf4 Rb4+ 10. Kf5 Rb5+ 11. Kf6 and wins.

G. Nadareishvili
Lelo, 1950
2nd Prize
[7K/2p5/4p3/2p2kPP/8/4P3/2b5/4n3]
  Win(4+6)  
      1. g6 Kf6!
1. - e5 2. g7 Bb3 3. h6 Nf3 4. h7 Nh4 5. g8=Q Ng6+ 6. Kg7
2. g7 Bh7! 3. e4!
3. Kxh7? Nf3 4. g8=Q Ng5+ 5. Qxg5+ Kxg5 6. h6 c4 7. Kg7 c3 8. h7 c2 9. h8=Q c1=Q 10. Qh6+ Kg4 (10. - Kf5? 11. e4+) 11. Qxe6+ Kf3 12. Qf5+ Ke2 (12. - Kxe3 13. Qg5+) 13. e4 c5
3. - Nf3 4. e5+! Nxe5 5. Kxh7 Nf3 6. g8=Q Ng5+ 7. Qxg5+!
7. Kh8? Nf7+ 8. Kh7 Ng5+ 9. Kh6 Nf7+
7. - Kxg5 8. h6 c4
8. - Kf6 9. Kg8
9. Kg7 c3 10. h7 c2 11. h8=Q c1=Q 12. Qh6+ and wins.

A. Kuznetsov & B. Sacharov
Troitzky Memorial Tourney, 1956
3rd Honourable Mention
[8/2K2p2/8/8/2P5/2P2P2/7k/1b6]
  Draw(4+3)  
      1. c5!
1. Kd6? Kg3 2. Ke5 f5 3. c5 f4! 4. c4 (4. c6 Bd3) Kxf3 5. c6 Kg4 6. c7 Bf5 or 3. f4 Kg4 4. c5 Be4 5. c4 Ba8 6. Kd6 Kxf4 7. c6 Ke4! 8. c7 Bb7 9. c5 Kd4 10. c6 Ba6 11. Kd7 Kd5
1. - Kg3
1. - Bf5 2. Kd8! Bh3 3. c6 f5 4. c7 f4 5. c8=Q Bxc8 6. Kxc8 Kg3 7. c4 Kxf3 8. c5
2. c6 f5
2. - Kxf3 3. Kd6! Bd3 4. c7 Ba6 5. Ke5! Bc8 6. Kf6 Be6 7. c8=Q Bxc8 8. Kxf7
3. f4!
3. Kd6? Bd3 4. c7 Ba6
3. - Kxf4 4. Kb6! Ba2 5. c4! Bxc4 6. Kc5 Be6
6. - Bf1 7. Kb6!
6. - Ba2 7. Kd6!
7. Kd6 Bc8 8. Kc7 Ba6 9. Kb6 Bc4 10. Kc5 Ba6 11. Kb6 Bc8 12. Kc7 Be6 13. Kd6 Bc4 14. Kc5 Draw!

E. Dobrescu
Problem, 1966
3rd Prize
[8/6K1/3p4/5p2/8/8/2P1B3/2k5]
  Win(3+3)  
      1. Bd3
1. c4? Kd2 2. Bf1 Kc,e3 3. Kf6 Kd4 followed by 4. - Kc5 and 5. - d5
1. - f4 2. Kf6!
2. Kg6? d5 3. Kf5 f3 4. Ke5 f2 5. c3 Kb2 6. Kd4 Kb3
2. - f3
2. - Kd2 3. Kf5 f3 4. Ke4 f2 5. c4
3. c4
3. Kf5? d5
3. - Kd2 4. Bf1 Ke3 5. Ke7!!
5. Ke6? Kf2 6. Bh3 Kg3 7. Bf5 Kf4 8. Bd3 Ke3 9. Bf1 Kf2 10. Bh3 Kg3 11. Bf5 Kf4 12. Kf6 Ke3
5. - Kf2 6. Bh3
6. Bd3? Ke3
6. - Kg3 7. Bf5 Kf4 8. Ke6!
8. Bd3? Ke3
8. - f2 9. Bd,h3 Ke,g3 10. Bf1 and wins.

15 July 2011

Brilliant Endgame Studies Galore (II)

As announced, here are the next ten endgame studies for your enjoyment.

T. Gorgiev
Moscow Tourney, 1936
1st Honourable Mention
[8/8/3P4/2r5/4B2k/4r1p1/8/5R1K]
  Win(4+4)  
      1. d7 g2+ 2. Kxg2
2. Bxg2? Rd3
2. - Re2+
2. - Rg3+ 3. Kf2 Rg8 4. Rh1+ K~ 5. Rg1+
3. Kf3 Rd2 4. Kf4 Rc3 5. Bd3
a) 5. - Rdxd3 6. Rh1+ Rh3 7. d8=Q+ Kh5 8. Qg5#
b) 5. - Rcxd3 6. d8=Q+ Rxd8 7. Rh1+ Rh2 8. Rxh2#


A. Herbstmann & L. Kubbel
Leningrad Central Chess Club Tourney, 1937
1st Prize
[8/8/8/7n/8/7N/3kp1K1/5n2]
  Draw(5+3)  
      1. Ng1 Ne3+
1. - e1=Q 2. Nf3+
1. - Nf4+ 2. Kh1 e1=N 3. Nf3+ Nxf3
2. Kh3 Nf4+
2. - e1=N 3. Nf3+ Nxf3 stalemate
3. Kh2 Ng4+
3. - e1=N 4. Nf3+ Nxf3 5. Kg3
3. - Nf1+ 4. Kh1 e1=N 5. Nf3+ Nxf3 stalemate
4. Kh1 Nf2+
4. - e1=N 5. Nf3+ Nxf3 stalemate
4. - e1=Q stalemate
5. Kh2 e1=N 6. Nf3+
6. Kg3? Ned3
6. - Nxf3+ 7. Kg3 Ke3 stalemate

V. Halberstadt
Magyar Sakkvilág, 1938
3rd Prize
[6B1/4K1k1/8/5P2/8/8/4n2n/8]
  Win(3+3)  
      1. f6+ Kh8! 2. Bd5
2. f7? Nf4 3. f8=Q Ng6+

a) 2. - Nf4 3. Be4 Ng4 4. f7 Ng6+ 5. Bxg6 Nh6 6. f8=B! and wins.
6. f8=Q+? Ng8+ 7. Ke8 stalemate
6. f8=R+? Kg7 (6. - Ng8+? 7. Ke8) 7. Bc2 (7. Bf7 Nf5+ 8. Ke8 Nd6+) Ng8+ 8. Ke8 Nf6+

b) 2. - Nd4 3. Be4 Ng4 4. f7 Nf5+ 5. Bxf5 Nh6 6. f8=R+!!
6. f8=Q? Ng8+ 7. K~ stalemate
6. - Kg7
6. - Ng8+ 7. Ke8 Kg7 8. Rf7+ Kh6 9. Bh7
7. Be6 and wins.

V. Halberstadt
Schackvärlden, 1938
[8/3B3p/6P1/7k/8/2r2N1P/5K2/4r3]
  Win(5+4)  
      1. g7!

a) 1. - Re8 2. Bxe8+ Kh6 3. g8=Q!
3. g8=N+? Kg7 4. Ne7 Kf8 5. Bb5 Rxf3+ 6. Kxf3 Kxe7
3. g8=B? Rxf3+
3. - Rxf3+ 4. Ke2 Re3+ 5. Kd2 Rd3+ 6. Kc2 Rc3+ 7. Kb2 Rc2+ 8. Ka3 Rc3+ 9. Kb4 and wins.

b) 1. - Rc8 2. Bxc8 Re8 3. Be6

c) 1. - Rf1+ 2. Kxf1 Rxf3+ 3. Kg2

d) 1. - Rxf3+ 2. Kxf3!
2. Kxe1 Rg3 3. Bg4+ Rxg4 4. hxg4+ Kh6 5. g8=B Kg5 6. Be6 h5

d1) 2. - Rg1 3. Bg4+
d11) 3. - Rxg4 4. hxg4+ Kh6 5. g8=B!!
5. g8=N+ Kg5 6. Ne7 h5
5. - Kg6 6. Kf4 h5 7. g5
d12) 3. - Kh6 4. g8=R!!
4. g8=Q Rg3+ 5. Kf4 (5. Ke2 Rg2+) Rxg4+ 6. hxg4
4. - Rg3+ 5. Kf4 Rf3+ (5. - Rxg4+ 6. Rxg4) 6. Ke5 Re3+ 7. Kf6 Rg3 8. Ke7!

d2) 2. - Rf1+ 3. Kg2!
3. Ke4 Rg1 4. Bg4+ Rxg4+ 5. hxg4+ Kh6 6. g8=B Kg5 7. Kf3 h5
3. - Rf6
3. - Rf7 4. g8=Q
4. g8=Q Rg6+ 5. Bg4+

d3) 2. - Re8 3. Bxe8+ Kh6 4. g8=N+! Kg7 5. Ne7 Kf8 6. Nd5 Kxe8 7. Nf6+

M. Liburkin
Shakhmaty v SSSR, 1938
4th Prize
[8/8/8/8/6p1/1N6/2k1K2n/R3b3]
  Win(3+4)  
      1. Nd4+ Kc3 2. Nb5+ Kc4!
2. - Kb3 Rb1+
3. Nd6+
3. Na3+? Kb3 4. Kxe1 Kb2 5. Nc2 Nf3+ 6. Kd1 g3
3. - Kc5! 4. Nb7+!
4. Ne4+ Kd5 5. Nf6+ Ke5 6. Nd7+ Ke6 7. Nc5+ Kd5
4. - Kc6 5. Nd8+ Kc7 6. Ne6+ Kd7!
6. - Kd6 7. Ra6+
7. Nf8+ Ke7 8. Ng6+ Kf7 9. Nh8+ Kg7 10. Rxe1 Kxh8
10. - Nf3 11. Rh1 Ng5 12. Kf2 Nh3+ 13. Kg3 Kxh8 14. Kxg4
11. Rh1 g3 12. Ke3 Kg7 13. Kf4 g2 14. Rg1 Nf1 15. Rxg2+ Kh6 16. Rf2

V. Korolkov & L. Mitrofanov
FIDE Tourney, 1959
1st Prize
[5R2/8/P7/1K1k4/8/1b2r3/5PPr/6b1]
  Draw(5+5)  
      1. a7 Ba4+!
1. - Bc4+ 2. Ka4
2. Kxa4 Rh4+ 3. g4!
3. f4? Re4+ 4. Kb5 Bxa7
3. - Rxg4+ 4. f4 Re4+ 5. Kb5! Bxa7 6. Rd8+ Ke6 7. Re8+ Kf5 8. Rf8+ Kg6 9. Rg8+ Kh5 10. Rh8+ Kg6 11. Rg8+ Kf5 12. Rf8+ Ke6 13. Re8+ Kd5 14. Rd8+ draw.

Z. Birnov
Trud, 1947
2nd Prize
[8/P1k5/3p4/8/2K3Rb/8/2p5/8]
  Win(3+4)  
      1. Rg7+!
1. Rg1? Bf2 2. Ra1 c1=Q+ 3. Rxc1 Bxa7
1. - Kb6 2. a8=N+! Ka6
2. - Ka5 3. Ra7#
2. - Kc6 3. Rc7#
3. Nc7+
3. Rg1 Bg5!
3. - Ka5
3. - Kb7 4. Ne6+ Kc6 5. Rg1
3. - Kb6 4. Nd5+ Ka6 (4. - Ka5 5. Ra7#) 5. Nb4+
4. Rg1 Bg5 5. Rxg5+! d5+! 6. Rxd5+ Ka4
6. - Kb6 7. Rb5+ Kxc7 8. Rc5+ or 7. - Ka7 8. Ra5+ Kb~ 9. Ra1
7. Nb5! c1=Q+
7. - Ka5 8. Nd4+ (8. Na3+? Ka4 9. Nxc2 stalemate) Ka4 9. Nb3,e2 (9. Nxc2 stalemate)
8. Nc3+ Ka3 9. Ra5+ Kb2 10. Ra2#

G. Gorbunov & V. Jakovenko
Shakhmaty v SSSR, 1988
3rd Prize
[6K1/7p/3kP2B/8/1p6/5r2/2BP4/8]
  Win(5+4)  
      1. Bd1
1. Be4? Rh3 2. Bf8+ Kxe6
1. - Rf6
1. - Rh3 2. Bf8+ Kxe6 3. Bg4+
2. e7! Kxe7 3. Bg5 h6!
3. - Ke6 4. Bxf6
4. Bh4 Ke6 5. Bg4+ Rf5
5. - Ke5 6. d4+! Kf4 7. Bxf6 Kxg4 8. d5 Kf5 9. Kf7
6. Kg7!
6. d4? b3! 7. Kg7 b2
6. - h5! 7. Bh3 Ke5 8. Bg3+ Rf4
8. - Ke4 9. d3+
9. Kg6!
9. Kh6? Ke4! 10. Bxf4 Kxf4 11. Kxh5 Ke4 12. Bf1 b3
9. - h4!
9. - Ke4 10. Bg2+ Rf3 11. Kxh5
10. Bh2 Ke4 11. Bg2+ Rf3 12. Kg5 h3! 13. Bh1 b3 14. Kg4 b2 15. Bxf3+ Kd4 16. Bg1+ Kd3
16. - Ke5 17. d4+! Kd6 18. Be4
17. Kf5!
17. Kf4? h2! 18. Bxh2 Kxd2 19. Be4 Kc1
17. - Kxd2 18. Be4 Kc1 19. Be3+ Kd1 20. Bf4

D. Gurgenidze
Leninska Smena, 1988
2nd Honourable Mention
[3n3K/5P2/6kP/1P6/8/2n5/8/8]
  Win(4+3)  
      1. f8=Q Nf7+ 2. Kg8!!
2. Qxf7+? Kxf7 3. b6 Nd5 4. b7 Ne7 5. b8=Q Ng6+ 6. Kh7 Nf8+ 7. Kh8 Ng6+
2. - Nxh6+ 3. Kh8!
3. Qxh6+? Kxh6 4. b6 Nd5 5. b7 Ne7+
3. - Nf7+ 4. Qxf7+ Kxf7 5. b6 Nd5 6. b7 Ne7 7. b8=Q Ng6+ 8. Kh7 Nf8+ 9. Kh6

M. Bordeniuk
All-Union Team Championship USSR, 1972
1st Prize
[1b2K3/p7/P2pk3/1p6/1P6/3P4/6B1/8]
  Win(5+5)  
      1. Bd5+!!
1. Bh3+? Kf6 2. Kd7 d5 3. Kc6 Be5 4. Kxd5 Bc7 5. Kc6 Bb6 6. Kxb5 Ke7
1. - Ke5!
1. - Kxd5 2. Kd7 Kd4,e5 3. Kc8
2. Kd8! Kxd5 3. Kd7!!
3. Kc8? Kc6 4. Kxb8 Kb6
3. - Kd4 4. Kc8 Kd5 5. Kb7!
5. Kxb8? Kc6 6. Ka7 Kc7 7. d4 d5
5. - Ke6 6. Kxb8 Kd7 7. Kb7 d5
7. - Kd8 8. Kc6
8. Kxa7 Kc7 9. d4

08 July 2011

Brilliant Endgame Studies Galore (I)

There are so many great studies! I've selected several dozens for you and will show ten of them each week. Hopefully, you do not know all of them already.

L. J. Bodding
Sissa, 1853
[8/8/8/pP6/6p1/pk4Pp/7P/2K5]
  Win(4+5)  
      1. Kb1 a2+ 2. Ka1 Kb4 3. b6 Ka3 4. b7 a4 5. b8=N
5. b8=D,T? stalemate
5. b8=B? Kb3 6. Bd6,e5 Kc4! 7. Ka2 Kd5! followed by Ke4-f3-g2xh2
5. - Kb3 6. Nc6,d7 Kc3 7. Ne5 Kd2 8. Nxg4 Ke2 9. Ne5 Kf2 10. g4 Kg2 11. g5 Kxh2 12. g6 Kh1 13. g7 and wins.

L. J. Bodding
Sissa, 1853
[8/8/8/pP6/8/pk5p/7P/2K5]
  Win(3+4)  
      1. Kb1 a2+ 2. Ka1 Kb4
There's no problem after 2. - Ka3 3. b6 a4 4. b7 Kb3 5. b8=Q+.
3. b6 Ka3 4. b7 a4 5. b8=B! and wins.
Not 5. b8=N? Kb3 6. Nc6 Kc2 7. Ne5 Kd2 8. Nf3+ Ke2.

V. Platov
Rigaer Tageblatt, 1905
3rd Prize
[R7/1p4p1/2q4p/1N6/4kP2/6P1/2PPp3/4K3]
  Win(7+6)  
      1. Re8+ Kd5
1. - Qxe8 2. Nd6+
1. - Kf5 2. Nd4+
2. Re6! Qc4
2. - Kxe6 3. Nd4+
2. - Qxe6 3. Nc7+
2. - Qxb5 3. Re5+
2. - Qd7 3. Rd6+
2. - Qxc2 3. Re5+ Kc4/Kc6 4. Na3+/Nd4+
2. - Qc8 3. Re5+ Kc4/Kc6 4. Nd6+/Na7+
3. Re4! Qc6!
3. - Kxe4 4. Nd6+
3. - Qxe4 4. Nc3+
3. - Qa2 4. Nc3+
4. d3 (thr. 5. Re5#) Qf6
4. - Qd7 5. Rd4+
4. - Kc5 5. Rc4+
5. Re5+ Kc6 6. Re6+ Qxe6 7. Nd4+ and 8. Nxe6

V. Kivi
Revista Romana de Sah, 1938
1st Honourable Mention
[2N5/8/2k5/8/4p3/2p1P3/6K1/5B2]
  Win(4+3)  
      1. Ne7+!
1. Bb5+? Kxb5 2. Nd6+ Kb4! 3. Nxe4 c2 4. Nf2 Kc4!
1. - Kb7!
1. - Kc5 2. Nf5 c2 3. Nd4 c1=Q (3. - c1=N 4. Kg3 Kd5 5. Kf4 Na2 6. Bg2) 4. Nb3+
1. - Kd6 2. Nf5+
1. - Kd7 2. Bb5+ Kxe7 3. Ba4
1. - Kb6,c7 2. Nd5+
2. Ba6+! Ka8
2. - Kxa6 3. Nd5 c2 4. Nb4
2. - Ka7,b8 3. Nc6+ K~ 4. Nd4
3. Nc6! c2 4. Bb7+ Kxb7 5. Na5+ Kb6 6. Nb3 and wins.

H. Rink
Chess Amateur, 1916
1st Prize
[3n2k1/3N4/7P/6N1/8/K7/7P/4b3]
  Win(5+3)  
      1. Nf6+
1. h7+? Kg7! 2. Nf6 Bh4! 3. Nfe4 Bxg5 4. Nxg5 Nb7 5. Kb4 Nd6 6. Kc5 Ne8
1. - Kh8
1. - Kf8 2. h7 Kg7 3. Nh5+ Kh8 4. Nf4 Kg7 5. Ng6 Nf7 6. Nxf7
2. Nf3 Bc3
2. - B~ 3. Nh4 4. Ng6#
3. Nd5 Ba5
3. - Ba1 4. Ka2
4. Ka4 Nb7 5. Kb5 Bd8 6. Kc6 Na5+ 7. Kd7 Nb7 8. Kc8 and wins.

R. Brieger
Chess Life & Review, 1984
1st Prize
[8/K4n2/1P6/k1p5/2P5/1P6/8/8]
  Win(4+3)  
      1. Kb7!
1. b7? Nd8 2. b8=N Kb4 or 2. b8=Q Nc6+
1. - Ne5
1. - Nd8+ 2. Kc7 Ne6+ 3. Kd7 Nf8+ 4. Kc6
2. Kc7 Nd3 3. b7 Nb4 4. Kb8
4. b8=Q Na6+
4. - Na6+
4. - Kb6 5. Kc8 Na,c6 6. b8=Q+ Nxb8 7. Kxb8
4. - Ka6 5. Kc8 Nc6 6. Kc7
4. - Nc6+ 5. Kc8 Ka6,b4 6. Kc7
5. Ka7 Nb4 6. b8=N
6. b8=Q Nc6+
6. - N~ 7. Nc6#

W. Proskurowski
Szachy, 1964
1st/2nd Prize
[k2K4/pp6/P3P3/8/8/8/1p6/8]
  Win(3+4)  
      1. e7 b1=Q 2. e8=Q Qh7
2. - bxa6 3. Kc7+
3. Kc8 Qg7
3. - bxa6 4. Qc6+
3. - Qe4 4. Kc7+ Qxe8 5. axb7#
4. Qd8 Qf7 5. Qh8 Qe7 6. Qg8 bxa6 7. Qg2+ Qb7+ 8. Qxb7#

D. Blundell
Diagrammes, 1994
1st Prize
[8/8/8/4p2k/4Pp2/8/2N5/1K6]
  Win(3+3)  
      1. Na1!!
1. Na3? f3 2. Nc4 Kg5! (2. - Kg4? 3. Kc2 Kg3 4. Kc3 Kg4 5. Nxe5+ Kf4 6. Kd4 f2 7. Nd3+; 2. - Kh4? 3. Kb2! Kh3 4. Kb3 Kg4 5. Kc2!) 3. Kc2 Kg4 4. Kd3 Kg3 or 4. Kc3 Kg3,5 or 4. Nd2 Kf4 5. Kd3 f2
1. Kc1? f3 2. Kd2 f2 3. Ke2 Kg4 4. Ne3+ Kf4 5. Kd3 Kg3 6. Nf1+ Kf3 7. Nd2+ Kf4 8. Ke2 f1=Q+! 9. Kxf1 Ke3
1. - f3 2. Nb3 Kg4 3. Kc2 Kg3 4. Kc3 Kg4 5. Kc4 Kg3 6. Kd5 Kf4 7. Nd2 f2 8. Nf1 and wins.

R. Missiaen
Schakend Nederland, 1974
2nd Prize
[k4b2/8/8/8/8/1b6/2R3K1/3B4]
  Win(3+3)  
      1. Bf3+ Ka7
1. - Kb8 2. Rb2
2. Rc3 Be6
2. - Ba2,4 3. Rc8 Bf~ 4. Ra8+
2. - Bf7 3. Rc7+
2. - Bg8 3. Rc8
3. Rc6
3. Kh1? Bh3
3. - Bb3
3. - Bd7 4. Rc7+
3. - Bf5 4. Rf6
4. Kh1! Bb4
4. - Ba3 5. Rc3
4. - Be,g7 5. Rc7+
5. Rc1 Bg8
5. - Ba2 6. Ra1
5. - Be6 6. Rc7+ Kb8 7. Rc6 Be~ 8. Rb6+
5. - Bd6 6. Ra1+ Kb6 7. Rb1
5. - Ba5 6. Ra1 Ka6 7. Be2+ Kb6 8. Rb1
6. Rg1 Be6
6. - Bf7 7. Rg7
6. - Bc4 7. Rg4
6. - Bb3 7. Rb1
7. Rg7+ Kb6
7. - Kb8 8. Rb7+
8. Rg6 and wins.

P. Joitsa
Revista de Romana de Sah, 1964
3rd Honourable Mention
[8/8/8/5B2/8/1b5p/8/K3kNN1]
  Win(4+3)  
      1. Nh2!
1. Bxh3? Kf2 2. Nd2 Bd1,5!
1. - Kf2 2. Nxh3+!
2. Ngf3 Kg2 3. ~ Bd1
2. - Kg2 3. Kb2
3. Ng4? Kxh3 4. Kb2 Ba4! 5. Ka3 Bb5!
3. - Ba4
3. - Bc4,d1,d5 4. Ng4 Kxh3 5. Ne3+
3. - Bf7,g8 4. Ng4 Kxh3 5. Nf6+
4. Ka3 Bb5 5. Kb4 Ba6 6. Ka5 Bb7 7. Kb6 Ba8 8. Ka7 Bc6 9. Ng4 Kxh3 10. Ne5+ K~ 11. Nxc6 and wins.

01 July 2011

The Bernoulli-Barnes Experiment

You probably knew or found out that the previous posts were based on the second edition of the most probably well-known book The Chess Endgame Study: A Comprehensive Introduction by Arthur John Roycroft. Yes, I am a bit lazy coming up with new stuff all the time. Anyway, for a last time, I avail myself of it. Roycroft wrote about an experiment he conducted with Barry P. Barnes in 1964. I repeated it, though with less time. The original experiment took three months, mine about three days. Of course, I didn't know the study that was used and I didn't read Barnes' comments.

The experiment went like this: There were thirteen serially numbered sealed envelopes, each containing a diagram. The first envelope contained the final position of a drawn study. The instruction was to open it and examine the contents. A decision had to be made what the previous move of the main line solution was and the train of thought in arriving at the decision was to be noted. Only after that, the second envelope could be opened. That one and the succeeding envelopes contained alternate White and Black moves working back to the initial position, that is, the one that would normally be published as a study.

In case you don't know the book nor that study, you can also join the experiment. I was not too shy to do a little bit of scripting (yes, JavaScript must be enabled), so that you can have the same experience as Mr. Barnes and me. Only click to show the next diagram when you've made your decision. You don't need my comments, that should be self-evident. I simply provide them for completeness sake and maybe you want to compare your notes with mine. Here we go ...

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[8/4P3/8/1k1N4/8/8/3b4/1K4q1]
Black moved last (3+3)
    



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That was a very nice experiment. Comparing my notes with those of Mr. Barnes, I see that I was a little bit sketchy, though I guessed all moves correctly. How about you?


Finally, here is the solution to the quiz:
It's Barry Greenstein. He gives away a free copy of his book Ace on the River to the player who eliminates him in a tournament, including his autograph and details of the hand.