30 September 2011

Oompah-pah!

Obviously, this blog gained more and more popularity since July. And this week, there have been even more pageviews due to a mention on MatPlus.Net. Thanks a lot for the acknowledgement!



It's still Oktoberfest time, therefore I continue to present problems that puzzle you even more after having drunk some Maß (1 liter stein) of beer. Cheers!


  1Bruno Ebner  
Die Schwalbe 02/1972
[8/2p5/2Q5/rpNK4/pk1N4/p1pR4/1p1p4/2r5]
  #1(5+10)  

  2S.C. Herz  
Jugendschach 12/1979
[1Rb5/Kp6/8/8/8/5pR1/6Pk/6qB]
  #1(5+5)  

Solutions
1The position is illegal. It requires more captures by black pawns than white pieces missing. Remove one white piece:
-wNd4: Rd3-d4#
-wQc6: Nd4-c6#
-wNc5: Qc6-c5#
-wRd3: Nc5-d3#
This discloses a cyclical pattern. Very nice!
2Once again, German-speaking people have a little bit more fun. A closer look at the name of the composer tells them already it's a joke (Scherz) problem.
White is in check, so it's him to move: 1. Ka8 Qa1#. But the position of wBh1 is not legal. Rotating the board by 180 degrees results in a legal position, however it does not allow a checkmate in one move.
The explanation is that the kit manager is a negligent guy. The chessboard was torn apart in the middle (between rank 4 and 5) and wrongly put together — upper and lower part have to be swapped. Then, there is 1. Rh7#.

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