03 August 2012

Domination

Domination is a theme you can find in many endgame studies. It occurs when a piece has a relatively wide choice of destination squares, but nevertheless cannot avoid being captured. I'll show you some examples.

A. Herbstman
Communist Party Congress Tourney, 1934
3rd Prize
Version
[8/8/8/5r2/2K2P1p/6R1/k3p3/4bB2]
  Draw(4+5)  
    1. Rg2! Rxf4+ 2. Kd3 Rxf1 3. Kxe2 Rh1 4. Kf3+ Ka3 5. Ra2+ Kxa2 6. Kg2
White dominates the black rook and obtains the well-known positional draw based on the 'wrong-coloured' rook pawn.

H. Rinck
Els Escacs a Catalunya et Jaque, 1935
[2k4b/2P5/8/6N1/8/P7/2K5/8]
  Win(4+2)  
    1. Nf7!
1. Ne6? Be5 2. Kb3 Bxc7
1. - Ba1! 2. Kb1
2. Nd6+? Kxc7 3. Kb1 Be5 or 3. Nb5+ Kb6 4. Nc3 Bxc3
2. - Bg7,Bf6 3. Nd6+ Kxc7 4. Ne8+ or
2. - Bc3,Bd4 3. Nd6+ Kxc7 4. Nb5+
and White wins.

V. Korolkov
L. Mitrofanov
FIDE Tourney, 1959
1st Prize
[5R2/8/P7/1K1k4/8/1b2r3/5PPr/6b1]
  Draw(5+4)  
    1. a7!
1. fxe3? Bc4+ 2. Ka5 Bxe3
1. Rd8+? Ke6 2. Re8+ (2. fxe3 Rh7) Kf7 3. Rxe3 Rh5+ 4. Kb4 Bd5 5. Re2 Rf5
1. - Ba4+!
1. - Bc4+ 2. Kb4 Rb3+ 3. Ka4 Bb5+ 4. Kxb3 Bc6 5. a8=Q
2. Kxa4 Rh4+ 3. g4!
3. f4? Re4+ 4. Kb5 Bxa7
3. - Rxg4+ 4. f4
4. Kb5? Rb3+ 5. Ka5 Ra3+ 6. Kb6 Rb4+
4. - Re4+ 5. Kb5! Bxa7 6. Rd8+ Ke6 7. Re8+ Kf5 8. Rf8+ Kg6 9. Rg8+ Kh5 10. Rh8+ Kg6 11. Rg8+ Kf5 12. Rf8+ Ke6 13. Re8+ Kd5 14. Rd8+
White either gets a perpetual check or wins a rook, reaching a materially drawn endgame.

D. Gurgenidze
L. Mitrofanov
Molodoj Leninets (Kurgan), 1981
1st Prize
Version (1984)
[8/8/8/2pK3p/8/5N2/1P4pq/5Rbk]
  Win(4+6)  
    1. Rb1!
1. Re1? c4 2. Ke4 c3 3. bxc3 h4 4. Kf5 h3 (or 4. - Qh3+) 5. Kg4 Qg3+! (5. - Qf4+? 6. Kxf4 h2 7. Nxh2 Kxh2 8. Kf3) 6. Kxg3 h2
1. Ra1? c4! 2. Ke4 h4 3. Re1 h3 4. Ra1 c3 5. b4! c2 6. b5 c1=Q 7. Rxc1 Qe5+! 8. Kxe5 (8. Nxe5 h2) 8. - h2 9. Nxh2 Kxh2 10. Kf4 Bb6 or 2. Kc6 h4 3. Kb7 h3 4. Ka8 c3 5. bxc3 Qb8+! 6. Kxb8 h2
1. - c4 2. Kc6! h4 3. Kb7! h3 4. Ka8!
4. Kc6? c3 5. bxc3 Qc7+! 6. Kxc7 h2
4. - c3
4. - Qb8+ 5. Kxb8 h2 6. Ng5 c3 7. Ne4 cxb2 8. Ng3#
5. bxc3 Qb8+! 6. Rxb8! h2
6. - Bc5 7. Rh8 or 6. - Bd4 7. cxd4 h2 8. Rb1+
7. Rh8 B~ 8. Rxh2#

J. de Villeneuve-Esclapon
Schweizerische Schachzeitung, 1923
1st Prize
Correction
[1k3B1r/N7/7P/8/3n4/7K/1b5P/8]
  Draw(5+4)  
    Version by P. Benko, Chess Life & Review 5/1992:
1. Bg7! Rh7 2. Kg4 Kxa7
2. - Kb7 3. Kh5 Nf5 4. Bxb2 Rxh6+ 5. Kg5 Rb6 6. Be5 Nd6 7. Bxd6 Rxd6 8. h4
3. Kh5 Nf5
3. - Ne6 4. Bxb2 Rb7 5. Ba3 Rb3 6. Be7 Rh3+ 7. Kg6 Kb7 8. Kf5 Nd8 9. Kg6
4. Bxb2 Rxh6+ 5. Kg5 Rxh2 6. Be5 Rf2 7. Bf4 Nd4 8. Be3 Rf5+ 9. Kg4 Rd5 10. Kf4 Kb6 11. Ke4 Kc5 12. Kd3

Other versions:
  • I. Maizelis, source ?, 1956
    8/k5Br/7P/8/3n2K1/8/1b6/8
    1. Kh5! Nf5 2. Bxb2 Rxh6+ 3. Kg5 Rh2 4. Be5 etc.
  • J. Van Reek, Endgame Study Composition in The Netherlands and Flanders, 1992
    k7/3B4/1r5P/3n2K1/8/1b6/8/8
    1. h7! Rb8 2. Be6

    2. Bf5? Ne3 3. Be4+ Bd5 4. Bd3 Rh8 5. Kg6 Bg8 6. Kg7 Bxh7
    2. - Rh8 3. Kh6 Nf6 4. Bxb3 Rxh7+ 5. Kg6 Rh3

    5. - Rb7 6. Be6 Ne4 7. Bd5
    6. Be6 Rf3 7. Bf5! Nd5! 8. Be4! Rf6+ 9. Kg5! Rd6 10. Kf5! Kb7 11. Ke5! Kc6! 12. Kd4!

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