28 September 2012

Mathematical stuff

Let's start with a construction task: create a twomover that shows the return of the piece that makes the key move as often as possible. Provided, no promoted pieces are used and no duals are allowed, the maximum seems to be 29. In 1980, Bernd Schwarzkopf had published a position with mate duals. Without knowing that, I made my own attempts (there was a little contest) about ten years laster and published a correct twomover. You'll surely find all the solutions, right?

Gerson Berlinger
32er Nr. 1-2, 1990
[6R1/4QP2/2P2NP1/1R3Nk1/3p1p2/3P4/3B4/7K]
  #2
  29 solutions
(11+3)  

The next diagram is a 16-in-1 problem. Have fun figuring out the solutions.

George Burt Spencer
St. Paul Dispatch, 1906
[2RKQbk1/2QB1k1K/KQpk1BPN/RKpp1QPk/Bpkp1KQn/BkNRKBBN/k1BQP1K1/BBK1kN1Q]
  #2
  on each file and rank
(34+15)  

Finally, a little retro puzzle.

Nikolai Beluchow
Die Schwalbe 12/2011
[1q3q1q/8/1q3Q1K/4N1N1/5q2/2RQ1k1Q/1K3P2/3Q1k1Q]
By mistake, two chess positions were rotated at a random angle each and then printed onto the same chess diagram. No two pieces were printed one over the other. Separate the two positions and orientate each one correctly! (11+7)

The solution is this:
[q7/8/q4kP1/8/5Q1Q/5R2/6K1/8]
last move: f5xg6 e.p.+
[2K2Q1Q/3N4/2Q1q2k/3N4/8/8/q1q5/8]
last move: g7xh8=Q+

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